The Friday 56: The Belles

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“With his love, Beauty birthed all the children of Orleans and spent her days making them look perfect and unique from one another. But she started spending more time with them, leaving her beloved in the sky alone for long spells of time. He called her home, but she was busy tending to their children. She’s always tell him, ‘Soon, I’ll come.’ She lost track of time. So finally, he sent storms and rain and lightning down in anger. The land flooded. Many died.”

Dhonielle Clayton’s The Belles utilizes the dystopian trope to comment on society’s obsession with beauty. Clayton’s writing draws the reader into this beautiful world and very carefully peels back its lovely facade, to reveal the ugliness hidden underneath. You can check out my review for this one hereCover is linked to Goodreads.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “Camellia Beauregard is a Belle. In the opulent world of Orléans, Belles are revered, for they control Beauty, and Beauty is a commodity coveted above all else. In Orléans, the people are born gray, they are born damned, and only with the help of a Belle and her talents can they transform and be made beautiful.
      But it’s not enough for Camellia to be just a Belle. She wants to be the favorite—the Belle chosen by the Queen of Orléans to live in the royal palace, to tend to the royal family and their court, to be recognized as the most talented Belle in the land. But once Camellia and her Belle sisters arrive at court, it becomes clear that being the favorite is not everything she always dreamed it would be. Behind the gilded palace walls live dark secrets, and Camellia soon learns that the very essence of her existence is a lie—that her powers are far greater, and could be more dangerous, than she ever imagined. And when the queen asks Camellia to risk her own life and help the ailing princess by using Belle powers in unintended ways, Camellia now faces an impossible decision.
      With the future of Orléans and its people at stake, Camellia must decide—save herself and her sisters and the way of the Belles—or resuscitate the princess, risk her own life, and change the ways of her world forever.”

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The Friday 56: Peluda

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

Ode to Brown Girls With Bangs

“you have always been a scared little girl.

original copycat, first poseur

check out this towel draped over your neck

get a load of this hair

gathered on the white tile floor—

a bunch of dark girls at the basement show

just started smoking

just stated fucking

just started getting really good

at lying to their mothers.”

I am in love with Melissa Lozado-Oliva’s poetry. I don’t pick up too much of the genre, but when I saw this poet reading from her collection, Peluda, I knew I had to have it for myself. I’m including the YouTube video of her reciting this above poem, so you can see for yourself how amazing she is. Excerpt taken from page 6 as the collection isn’t 56 pages long. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “One of the most original performance poets of her generation, Melissa Lozada-Oliva has captivated crowds across the country and online with her vivid narratives. Humorous and biting, personal and communal, self-deprecating and unapologetically self-loving, peluda (meaning ‘hairy’ or ‘hairy beast’) is the poet at her best. The book explores the relationship between femininity and body hair as well as the intersections of family, class, the immigrant experience, Latina identity, and much more, all through Lozada-Oliva’s unique lens and striking voice. peluda is a powerful testimony on body image and the triumph over taboo.”

The Friday 56: These Ruthless Deeds

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“As I watched her bones heal, the bleeding slow, and the bruises fade away, I let out a heavy sigh of relief. Within a minute, she looked like she might on any normal morning before rising from bed.

I’ve had Tarun Shanker and Kelly Zekas’s sequel These Ruthless Deeds for quite a while. I ended up rereading the first book and enjoyed it so much more the second time around. This second book was also a treat. You can read my mini-review of this one hereCover is linked to Goodreads. Excerpt taken from page 156.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “England, 1883. Still recovering from a devastating loss, Evelyn is determined to use her powers to save other gifted people from those who would harm them. But when her rescue of a young telekinetic girl goes terribly wrong, Evelyn finds herself indebted to a secret society devoted to recruiting and protecting people like Evelyn and her friends.
      As she follows the Society’s orders, healing the sick and embarking on perilous recruitment missions, Evelyn sees her problems disappear. Her reputation is repaired, her friends are provided for, and her parents are newly wealthy. She reunites with the dashing Mr. Kent and recovers the reclusive Mr. Braddock (who has much less to brood over now that the Society can help him to control his dangerous power). But Evelyn can’t help fearing the Society is more sinister than it appears…”

The Friday 56: Shame the Stars

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“You see, several men escaped the authorities. The story said as much, but what wasn’t in the paper, what my father wouldn’t dare print, was that some of the escaped men were local ranch hands—men from Morado Country who are so frustrated, so angry over this mantanza, this indiscriminate slaughter of our people, they’re ready to burn down any business owned or operated by Anglo immigrants.”

I didn’t get a chance to review this one, but wanted to make sure I still featured it for this meme. Guadalupe García McCall’s Shame the Stars sheds light on a lesser-known part of history for Mexicans and tejanos, where conflict from the Mexican Revolution spilled over into Texas, igniting racial tensions between tejanos and Texas Rangers. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “In the midst of racial conflict and at the edges of a war at the Texas-Mexico border in 1915, Joaquin and Dulceña attempt to maintain a secret romance in this reimagining of Romeo and Juliet.”

The Friday 56: Ruined

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“You are not allowed to have an opinion on my marriage,” Cas said, his voice like ice. “The contract is between me and Mary now. Do you understand me?”

I love when a book you put off reading ends up being an unexpected delight. I really enjoyed Amy Tintera’s Ruined and can’t wait to get to the sequel. You can read my review of this one hereCover is linked to Goodreads. Excerpt taken from page 156.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “Emelina Flores has nothing. Her home in Ruina has been ravaged by war. She lacks the powers of her fellow Ruined. Worst of all, she witnessed her parents’ brutal murders and watched helplessly as her sister, Olivia, was kidnapped.
      But because Em has nothing, she has nothing to lose. Driven by a blind desire for revenge, Em sets off on a dangerous journey to the enemy kingdom of Lera. Somewhere within Lera’s borders, Em hopes to find Olivia. But in order to find her, Em must infiltrate the royal family.
      In a brilliant, elaborate plan of deception and murder, Em marries Prince Casimir, next in line to take Lera’s throne. If anyone in Lera discovers Em is not Casimir’s true betrothed, Em will be executed on the spot. But it’s the only way to salvage Em’s kingdom and what is left of her family.
      Em is determined to succeed, but the closer she gets to the prince, the more she questions her mission. Em’s rage-filled heart begins to soften. But with her life—and her family—on the line, love could be Em’s deadliest mistake.”

The Friday 56: Monday’s Not Coming

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“That’s when a sparkle caught my eye. I glanced up and there she was. Monday. Standing near the bread aisle. Even with her back to me, you couldn’t miss her unmistakable denim jacket—the one with the red striped collar and rhinestones. The one I gave her. My knees gave in and I collapsed against the cart.”

Tiffany D. Jackson’s sophomore novel, Monday’s Not Coming, about a girl who disappears and the only one who seems to notice is her best friend, is a troubling and captivating mystery. You can read my full review here. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “Monday Charles is missing, and only Claudia seems to notice. Claudia and Monday have always been inseparable—more sisters than friends. So when Monday doesn’t turn up for the first day of school, Claudia’s worried. When she doesn’t show for the second day, or second week, Claudia knows that something is wrong. Monday wouldn’t just leave her to endure tests and bullies alone. Not after last year’s rumors and not with her grades on the line. Now Claudia needs her best—and only—friend more than ever. But Monday’s mother refuses to give Claudia a straight answer, and Monday’s sister April is even less help.
      As Claudia digs deeper into her friend’s disappearance, she discovers that no one seems to remember the last time they saw Monday. How can a teenage girl just vanish without anyone noticing that she’s gone?”