Can’t-Wait Wednesday: Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson


Can’t-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Tressa @ Wishful Endings where bloggers share their most anticipated reads that haven’t been released yet. Join us every Wednesday and watch your TBR list multiply. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

Before we get started, can I just say how much I love the cover for Lily Anderson’s Undead Girl Gang? I have a mighty need to rock a denim jacket again after seeing this cover. Unfortunately, I don’t think the one I owned as a kid would fit me now. Lily Anderson has become an auto-buy author for me. Her contemporary books are fun, witty, and so smart. Undead Girl Gang is different from what we’re used to seeing from her, but I have no doubt that this book is going to be a delight. Also, this one comes out the day after my birthday and the MC is Mexican, so it kind of feels like she wrote this for me. Thanks, Lily 😉 

 width=Title: Undead Girl Gang
Author: Lily Anderson
Series: N/A
Pages: 272
Publisher: Razorbill
Release Date: May 8, 2018

      “Mila Flores and her best friend Riley have always been inseparable. There’s not much excitement in their small town of Cross Creek, so Mila and Riley make their own fun, devoting most of their time to Riley’s favorite activity: amateur witchcraft.
      So when Riley and two Fairmont Academy mean girls die under suspicious circumstances, Mila refuses to believe everyone’s explanation that her BFF was involved in a suicide pact. Instead, armed with a tube of lip gloss and an ancient grimoire, Mila does the unthinkable to uncover the truth: she brings the girls back to life.
      Unfortunately, Riley, June, and Dayton have no recollection of their murders, but they do have unfinished business to attend to. Now, with only seven days until the spell wears off and the girls return to their graves, Mila must wrangle the distracted group of undead teens and work fast to discover their murderer…before the killer strikes again.”

Are you participating in Can’t-Wait Wednesday or Waiting on Wednesday? Is this book on your TBR? Be sure to leave a link to your post in the comments and I’ll visit!

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The Friday 56: Not Now, Not Ever

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

I reached for a Sharpie. Markers seemed safe. It was hard to spill a marker. I pushed the glitter pot farther away from me. “Space, robots, nuclear holocaust. Throw in ray guns or swords and I’m in.”

I’ve found a new go-to contemporary author. Lily Anderson’s novels are smart and funny and make me wish I was a teen genius who attended competitive camps. Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, Not Now, Not Ever is all kinds of fun and a celebration of everything nerdy (including books!). You can read my review here. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

**Apologies! I included the wrong synopsis for this book. I’ve corrected the mistake, but if the previous synopsis caught your attention, let me direct you to my review of that book here**

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “Elliot Gabaroche is very clear on what she isn’t going to do this summer.
      1. She isn’t going to stay home in Sacramento, where she’d have to sit through her stepmother’s sixth community theater production of The Importance of Being Earnest.
      2. She isn’t going to mock trial camp at UCLA.
     3. And she certainly isn’t going to the Air Force summer program on her mother’s base in Colorado Springs. As cool as it would be to live-action-role-play Ender’s Game, Ellie’s seen three generations of her family go through USAF boot camp up close, and she knows that it’s much less Luke/Yoda/”feel the force,” and much more one hundred push-ups on three days of no sleep. And that just isn’t appealing, no matter how many Xenomorphs from Alien she’d be able to defeat afterwards.
      What she is going to do is pack up her attitude, her favorite Octavia Butler novels, and her Jordans, and go to summer camp. Specifically, a cutthroat academic-decathlon-like competition for a full scholarship to Rayevich College, the only college with a Science Fiction Literature program. And she’s going to start over as Ever Lawrence, on her own terms, without the shadow of all her family’s expectations. Because why do what’s expected of you when you can fight other genius nerds to the death for a shot at the dream you’re sure your family will consider a complete waste of time?
      This summer’s going to be great.”

Not Now, Not Ever by Lily Anderson

Title: Not Now, Not Ever
Author: Lily Anderson
Series: N/A
Pages: 320
Publisher: Wednesday Books
Release Date: November 21st 2017

      “Elliot Gabaroche is very clear on what she isn’t going to do this summer.
      1. She isn’t going to stay home in Sacramento, where she’d have to sit through her stepmother’s sixth community theater production of The Importance of Being Earnest.
      2. She isn’t going to mock trial camp at UCLA.
      3. And she certainly isn’t going to the Air Force summer program on her mother’s base in Colorado Springs. As cool as it would be to live-action-role-play Ender’s Game, Ellie’s seen three generations of her family go through USAF boot camp up close, and she knows that it’s much less Luke/Yoda/”feel the force,” and much more one hundred push-ups on three days of no sleep. And that just isn’t appealing, no matter how many Xenomorphs from Alien she’d be able to defeat afterwards.
      What she is going to do is pack up her attitude, her favorite Octavia Butler novels, and her Jordans, and go to summer camp. Specifically, a cutthroat academic-decathlon-like competition for a full scholarship to Rayevich College, the only college with a Science Fiction Literature program. And she’s going to start over as Ever Lawrence, on her own terms, without the shadow of all her family’s expectations. Because why do what’s expected of you when you can fight other genius nerds to the death for a shot at the dream you’re sure your family will consider a complete waste of time?
      This summer’s going to be great.

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“I opened my mouth to laugh, but it died in my throat, threw itself a funeral, and dug graves for every ounce of joy that I could ever feel again…”

Lily Anderson’s companion novel to The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You is inspired by Oscar Wilde’s jovial play The Importance of Being Earnest. In Not Now, Not Ever, seventeen-year-old Elliot Gabaroche concocts a plan to attend Camp Onward in an effort to win a scholarship to her dream college. The only problem is she has to do it without her overprotective family finding out. But as Ever Laurence, Elliot gets to be whomever she chooses, without the expectations of her parents hanging over her head. Winning one of the few scholarships at a camp full of geniuses and keeping her scheme a secret becomes increasingly more difficult when Elliot’s annoying younger cousin Isaiah shows up, hoping to win a scholarship himself.

Elliot is a character who is easily relatable. On the verge of adulthood, Ellie needs to decide what path her life is going to take. This isn’t easy when she’s been born into a family where her choice of career means choosing one parents over the other. Her mother expects her to attend the Air Force Academy over the summer, to follow in so many Laurences’ footsteps. Her father and stepmother are hoping she takes a different route — the former hoping she chooses to study law like him. Elliot on the other hand has dreams of her own. At Rayevich College she’d have a chance to study her all-time favorite authors like Octavia Butler and N. K. Jemisin. Even though Elliot’s family is a point of contention in the novel, I loved how important a role family played in the story. It’s easy to see how much Elliot loves her parents and how much she doesn’t want to disappoint any of them. I also loved that this novel has a positive portrayal of a blended family where Elliot’s stepmom is an important part of her life. Elliot’s relationship with her cousin Isaiah has been defined by a childhood where her own accomplishments were always overshadowed by his own. I wanted more for the two of these characters in terms of their relationship. In the end, it felt like Elliot had more of a chance to mature, but this is her story, so it’s somewhat understandable.

The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You is filled with nerdy references and Anderson does not disappoint in this department when it comes to Not Now, Not Ever. A camp full of nerdy geniuses provides plenty of opportunity to celebrate all things geeky. Anderson has a way of writing settings where the cast of characters gets to celebrate their nerdiness in a fun and unapologetic way. One of my favorite things about her books is how authentic and relatable these incredibly intelligent characters end up being. Fans of the first novel will recognize some familiar faces and rediscover others. Elliot’s love interest, Brandon, for example, is a character that I didn’t know I wanted an update on. Their relationship is sweet with just enough realism to feel authentic.

Not Not, Not Ever is the perfect contemporary for those who love nerd culture. It can be read as a standalone, but I highly recommend everyone pick up both of Anderson’s novels as she continues to impress me with her writing.

4/5

★★★★

The Friday 56: The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“Kenny…Isn’t it a little hack to push around the freshmen? It’s so expected.”

I usually put together my Friday 56 posts right after finishing a book, but I somehow forgot this one. No worries, it just means I get to rave even more about Lily Anderson’s The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You because the more time that passes, the greater my fondness grows. This retelling of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing is so witty and funny, I’m already ready for a reread. It’s one of those novels that I wish I could gift to everyone in my life. You can read my review here. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “Trixie Watson has two very important goals for senior year: to finally save enough to buy the set of Doctor Who figurines at the local comic books store, and to place third in her class and knock Ben West–and his horrendous new mustache that he spent all summer growing–down to number four.
      Trixie will do anything to get her name ranked over Ben’s, including give up sleep and comic books–well, maybe not comic books–but definitely sleep. After all, the war of Watson v. West is as vicious as the Doctor v. Daleks and Browncoats v. Alliance combined, and it goes all the way back to the infamous monkey bars incident in the first grade. Over a decade later, it’s time to declare a champion once and for all.
      The war is Trixie’s for the winning, until her best friend starts dating Ben’s best friend and the two are unceremoniously dumped together and told to play nice. Finding common ground is odious and tooth-pullingly-painful, but Trixie and Ben’s cautious truce slowly transforms into a fandom-based tentative friendship. When Trixie’s best friend gets expelled for cheating and Trixie cries foul play, however, they have to choose who to believe and which side they’re on–and they might not pick the same side.

The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You by Lily Anderson

Title: The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You
Author: Lily Anderson
Series: N/A
Pages: 352
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin
Release Date: May 17th 2016

      “Trixie Watson has two very important goals for senior year: to finally save enough to buy the set of Doctor Who figurines at the local comic books store, and to place third in her class and knock Ben West–and his horrendous new mustache that he spent all summer growing–down to number four.
      Trixie will do anything to get her name ranked over Ben’s, including give up sleep and comic books–well, maybe not comic books–but definitely sleep. After all, the war of Watson v. West is as vicious as the Doctor v. Daleks and Browncoats v. Alliance combined, and it goes all the way back to the infamous monkey bars incident in the first grade. Over a decade later, it’s time to declare a champion once and for all.
      The war is Trixie’s for the winning, until her best friend starts dating Ben’s best friend and the two are unceremoniously dumped together and told to play nice. Finding common ground is odious and tooth-pullingly-painful, but Trixie and Ben’s cautious truce slowly transforms into a fandom-based tentative friendship. When Trixie’s best friend gets expelled for cheating and Trixie cries foul play, however, they have to choose who to believe and which side they’re on–and they might not pick the same side.

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“The very idea that Ben West and I had ever been anything other than bitter rivals was the most horrifying aspersion ever cast upon my character. Even worse than West himself accusing me of being a ‘fake geek girl’ back in sixth grade. “

Lily Anderson’s The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You is the modern retelling of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing that you didn’t know you needed. Trixie Watson and Ben West have been mortal enemies since grade school. To say that they hate each other’s guts would be an understatement. At Messina Academy for the Gifted, students are pushed to their academic limits. Trixie is determined to end her senior year by beating Ben in the rankings. Their verbal battles are notorious at school. Desperate for peace, their friends secretly hatch a plan to get the two to reconcile. When Trixie and Ben’s tenuous new friendship begins to evolve into something more, Trixe’s best friend is accused of manipulating the senior class rankings. Now Trixie will do anything to prove her friend’s innocence, but it may cost her her new found friendship with Ben.

The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You is a smart and funny contemporary. Trixie’s personality jumps right off the pages with her cheeky insults and nerdy allusions. I love how unapologetically geeky Trixie is and enjoyed reading about an entire group of nerdy teen friends. Trixie isn’t always a likable character. She remarks that Ben’s insults always go just a little too far, but Trixie is just as guilty of taking low blows. She’s sometimes more interested in taking a jab at Ben than recognizing her insults can be really harmful. I really admired Trixie’s unwavering loyalty to her best friend Harper. She sets aside her own interests and regardless of the consequences did everything she could to clear her friend of any wrongdoing. Despite her flaws or maybe because of them, I came to really love Trixie as a character. She makes mistakes, but more importantly she learns from them and grows.

The novel is told in first person which limits readers’ insight into certain characters. While I enjoyed the verbal sparring between Trixie and Ben, I was so happy when they were able to spend some time together without feeling the need to bite each other’s heads off. More alike than either of them would dare admit, Trixie and Ben get along surprisingly well. Bonding over comics, sci-fi shows, and graphic novels, the two learn to appreciate each other’s positive qualities. With that being said, I would have liked to have seen these two characters open up more with one another. Ben has some family issues that came up that I wanted more insight into and their relationship would have been a good access point.

With witty banter and steadfast friendship at its center, Lily Anderson’s The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You is a delightful retelling that had me invested in the main relationship from start to finish. I cannot wait for more novels by this gifted writer.

4/5

★★★★