Stalking Jack the Ripper by Kerri Maniscalco

stalking-jack-the-ripper-by-kerri-maniscalcoTitle: Stalking Jack the Ripper
Author: Kerri Maniscalco
Series: Stalking Jack the Ripper, #1
Pages: 326
Publisher: Jimmy Patterson
Release Date: September 20th 2016

      “Seventeen-year-old Audrey Rose Wadsworth was born a lord’s daughter, with a life of wealth and privilege stretched out before her. But between the social teas and silk dress fittings, she leads a forbidden secret life.
      Against her stern father’s wishes and society’s expectations, Audrey often slips away to her uncle’s laboratory to study the gruesome practice of forensic medicine. When her work on a string of savagely killed corpses drags Audrey into the investigation of a serial murderer, her search for answers brings her close to her own sheltered world.

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“Everything was most certainly not okay, and this was no mathematical equation; my hands were covered in blood. I frantically wiped them off on my bodice, but it was no use. Blood stained my fingers in a crimson accusation.”

Stalking Jack the Ripper is a nice blend of thrills and mystery. With a likable protagonist and detail-oriented story, this work of historical fiction was really fun to read. Jack the Ripper stories can be really intriguing as they are based on a mystery that’s never been solved and authors can do what they will when it comes to filling in the blanks. Though novels that center around the idea that the forward-thinking protagonist is not like other girls in her time period can be annoying at times, I still enjoyed reading about how Audrey Rose defied societal expectations and appreciated that most of the men in her life helped her instead of hindering her ambitions. I also liked that the author was sure not to put down other females or femininity itself in order to elevate the protagonist.

Aside from a couple of instances where I found it frustrating that Audrey Rose made the foolish mistake of wandering alone at night by herself with a serial killer on the loose, the protagonist was a character I could really get behind. Her interest in science stems from her mother’s passing and her eccentric uncle’s work with the dead, both as a professor and an assistant to the police, help her achieve her goals. Despite Stalking the Ripper‘s commitment to detail, the story does gloss over the fact that Audrey Rose’s grandmother was from India. I think this could have been a really defining and interesting part of the protagonist’s identity, but only a couple of times is this mentioned and I would have liked to have heard more about this part of Audrey Rose’s family.

I really liked the exchanges between Audrey Rose and her uncle’s assistant Thomas. He’s a little too sure of his deductive skills, which may drive the protagonist crazy, but also challenges her to be better herself. There were also times where he was sociably awkward one moment and adeptly flirtatious the next, which could be confusing. Stalking Jack the Ripper‘s mystery wasn’t too hard to unravel, as I had a pretty good idea of who the killer was pretty early on, but it was still entertaining to see the mystery unravel and I’m looking forward to seeing what new mystery Audrey Rose solves in the next book.

Rating: 4/5

★★★★

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Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys

Salt to the Sea by Ruta SepetysTitle: Salt to the Sea
Author: Ruta Sepetys
Series: N/A
Pages: 393
Publisher: Philomel Books
Release Date: February 2nd 2016

      “Winter, 1945. Four teenagers. Four secrets.
      Each one born of a different homeland; each one hunted, and haunted, by tragedy, lies…and war.
      As thousands of desperate refugees flock to the coast in the midst of a Soviet advance, four paths converge, vying for passage aboard the Wilhelm Gustloff, a ship that promises safety and freedom.
      Yet not all promises can be kept.
      Inspired by the single greatest tragedy in maritime history, bestselling and award-winning author Ruta Sepetys (Between Shades of Gray) lifts the veil on a shockingly little-known casualty of World War II. An illuminating and life-affirming tale of heart and hope.”

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“The bombs began falling. With each explosion, every bone in my body vibrated and hammered, clanging violently against the bell tower that was my flesh.”

Ruta Sepetys’s Salt to the Sea is a moving historical fiction novel that takes its time unfolding the mysteries of each character. Not being familiar with this particular historical event, I went into this knowing very little. Told through alternate points of view, each chapter gives a small glimpse into the four main characters: Joana, Florian, Emilia, and Alfred. It took some time to get used to the abrupt change in narration, as Sepetys only spends a few pages on each character before moving on. However, once you get acquainted with these characters, they hold your attention to the breathtaking end.

It bears noting that the synopsis for this novel is a little incorrect, as two of the four characters are adults and one specifically is twenty one. It doesn’t make much of a difference, but it put me in a different mindset when trying to get a handle on who these characters were. Joana’s story centers around the guilt she carries around. It isn’t revealed until later what she feels guilty about, but it’s a burden that weighs heavy on her. Her training as a nurse makes her irrevocably valuable to those she is traveling with and also opens doors for her and her companions to escape a terrible fate. When we first meet Florian, he’s standoffish and cold. Much of who he is is kept hidden, but as his journey has him crossing paths with the other characters, he slowly opens up. Florian’s connection to characters like Joana and Emilia is hard fought, he resisting most of all, but it is these relationships that play a vital role in how his journey will end.

Emilia is young and desperate. Trying to hide the fact that she is Polish becomes increasingly difficult, but meeting Florian and then Joana may give her a chance to survive in a world where her people have suffered so much at the hands of by both German and Soviet forces. She is both brave and a little naive, but her resilience defines her above all else. Alfred is the only character that I was confused about. Much of his narrative just felt like a young, confused kid running his mouth, not realizing how truly insignificant he was. It wasn’t until later on in the story that I fully understood his role. Though this was a deliberate technique on the author’s part, there were times when Alfred’s POV came up and I really didn’t feel very interested in his perspective.

Salt to the Sea is full of heartbreak, but also exemplifies the power of the human spirit in the face of unspeakable cruelty and tragedy.

Rating: 4/5

★★★★

Mini Reviews: The Female of the Species + Like a River Glorious

MiniWith the end of the year just around the corner, it’s nice to be able to put together a couple of mini reviews instead of full ones. This week I have a few thoughts to share on two recent releases: Mindy McGinnis’s The Female of the Species and Rae Carson’s Like a River Glorious. Covers below are linked to Goodreads.

Title: The Female of the Species
Author: Mindy McGinnis
Series: N/A
Pages: 344
Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books
Release Date: September 20th 2016 

      “Alex Craft knows how to kill someone. And she doesn’t feel bad about it. When her older sister, Anna, was murdered three years ago and the killer walked free, Alex uncaged the language she knows best. The language of violence.
      While her crime goes unpunished, Alex knows she can’t be trusted among other people, even in her small hometown. She relegates herself to the shadows, a girl who goes unseen in plain sight, unremarkable in the high school hallways.
      But Jack Fisher sees her. He’s the guy all other guys want to be: the star athlete gunning for valedictorian with the prom queen on his arm. Guilt over the role he played the night Anna’s body was discovered hasn’t let him forget Alex over the years, and now her green eyes amid a constellation of freckles have his attention. He doesn’t want to only see Alex Craft; he wants to know her.
      So does Peekay, the preacher’s kid, a girl whose identity is entangled with her dad’s job, though that does not stop her from knowing the taste of beer or missing the touch of her ex-boyfriend. When Peekay and Alex start working together at the animal shelter, a friendship forms and Alex’s protective nature extends to more than just the dogs and cats they care for.
      Circumstances bring Alex, Jack, and Peekay together as their senior year unfolds. While partying one night, Alex’s darker nature breaks out, setting the teens on a collision course that will change their lives forever.

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      “Sometimes I forget for one second and it hurts.
      It’s a different kind of pain than the constant, the weight that hangs from my heart. It swings from twine embedded so deeply that my aorta has grown around it. Blood pulses past rope in the chambers of my heart, dragging away tiny fibers until my whole body is suffused and pain is all I am and ever can be.

I had really high expectations for Mindy McGinnis’s The Female of the Species after being so impressed with A Madness So Discreet. While the concept itself was really interesting and I found myself rooting for Alex despite her violent tendencies (or maybe because of them), I was hoping for a deeper exploration of this protagonist’s psyche. From the get-go, we learn just what she is capable of and slowly get a bit of backstory to help understand where she inherited these vicious impulses, but I wish the narrative would have slowed down when it came to her backstory. Much of the story focuses on Alex’s growing relationship with both Peekay and Jack. Of the two main relationships highlighted in this novel, Alex’s friendship with Peekay felt more genuine and significant. Jack was a character I wanted to like, but his character development revolved only around Alex and I just wanted more from him. I don’t want to diminish the important subjects this novel touches on like rape culture and gender roles, so if either of those subjects interest you, I’d recommend this one.

Rating: 3/5

★★★


Title: Like a River Glorious
Author: Rae Carson
Series: The Gold Seer Trilogy, #2
Pages: 398
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Release Date: September 27th 2016

      “Lee Westfall survived the dangerous journey to California. She found a new family in the other outcasts of their wagon train, and Jefferson, her best friend, is beginning to woo her shamelessly. Now they have a real home—one rich in gold, thanks to Lee’s magical ability to sense the precious metal in the world around her.
      But Lee’s Uncle Hiram has survived his own journey west. He’s already murdered her parents, and he will do anything to have Lee and her talents under his control. No one is safe. When he kidnaps her, she sees firsthand the depths of his depravity.
      Lee’s magic is changing, though. It is growing. The gold no longer simply sings to her—it listens. It obeys her call. Will that alone be enough to destroy her uncle?”

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“A condor soars high above. It’s a giant of a bird, bigger even than an eagle, with magnificent black-and-white wings. Like everything else in this territory, it’s both familiar and odd, and it makes my old home in Georgia seem like a very small, distant place.”

Rae Carson proves once again in the second book in her Gold Seer Trilogy that she is a phenomenal writer. While I do think Like a River Glorious lacked the kind of focus found in Walk on Earth a Stranger, it was really enjoyable to read about Lee coming into her ability in this one. One of my favorite aspects of the first novel was Lee’s relationship with her best friend Jefferson. In this book, we see their relationship progress further, but I would have liked to have seen more of Lee’s feelings transition from friendly to romantic. With the way this Like a River Glorious ended, I’m unsure of Carson’s overall plot to this trilogy, as much of conflict seems resolved by the end of this one.

Rating: 3/5

★★★

Blood For Blood by Ryan Graudin

blood-for-blood-by-ryan-graudinTitle: Blood For Blood
Author: Ryan Graudin
Series: Wolf By Wolf, #2
Pages: 481
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Release Date: November 1st 2016

      “For the resistance in 1950s Germany, the war may be over, but the fight has just begun.
      Death camp survivor Yael, who has the power to skinshift, is on the run: the world has just seen her shoot and kill Hitler. But the truth of what happened is far more complicated, and its consequences are deadly. Yael and her unlikely comrades dive into enemy territory to try to turn the tide against the New Order, and there is no alternative but to see their mission through to the end, whatever the cost.
      But dark secrets reveal dark truths, and one question hangs over them all: how far can you go for the ones you love?”

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“Yael’s sidestep wasn’t swift enough; the tip of the bayonet dragged across her jacket, slicing all leather, no skin. Her second hit was more successful. Yael felt her bones connect with flesh, crack into cartilage.”

Ryan Graudin’s Wolf By Wolf is one of the best books I’ve read this year. Yael’s story was heartbreaking and moving, but was infused with such hope that it was hard to put down. In Blood For Blood, the conclusion to Graudin’s alternate history duology, Yael seeks to finish what she started after the assassination attempt on Hitler is thwarted by the same people who turned her into a skinshifter. Not everyone has realized that Yael did not kill the real Hitler, but her actions have set off a series of events, meant to signal a revolution. Across Europe, resistance fighters are rising up, willing to give their lives if it means crushing the Nazi regime for good, not knowing that the vile dictator still lives. As members of the resistances fight for their right to live, Yael and the people she’s met along the way are faces with difficult choices, between doing what is easy and being brave enough to do what’s right.

Yael is one of my favorite literary characters. Her resilience in the face of injustice and hatred is awe-inspiring, and in this second installment, she continues to impress me with her strength. In many ways Yael’s story comes full circle in this one. She’s struggled with identity issues since she was a child when the experiments done on her stripped her of who she was. The accusation of “monster” has been hanging over her ever since her own mother muttered the word. Yael has spent so much time being other people in order to aid the resistance, but in Blood For Blood, Yael’s most important role is being herself. She must comes to grips with who she is and what she’s done, and an important person from her past helps her to reconcile these feelings.

Graudin weaves many of the characters’ pasts throughout, painting both tragic and hopeful stories. In this second novel, we get a look at Felix’s and Luka’s perspectives. Felix’s character was defined heavily by his desperation to keep his sister safe. Still grieving his older brother’s death, Felix is the glue that has kept his family together. He’s convinced that he must keep them all safe no matter the cost. Luka’s character arc is perhaps my favorite. The arrogant two-time Axis Tour victor should be a character you could easily dislike, but he proves to be more and not just through his relationship with Yael. Luka does a lot of soul searching in this one. He’s lived a pretty scot-free life and has had the privilege of not acknowledging the horrors that Hitler and his party have committed. Luka learns to accept his own culpability, realizing that ignorance does not equal innocence. He also must decide where to go from here, if he’s willing to remain indifferent or finally take a stand.

Blood For Blood is just as heart-wrenching as its predecessor. Many of the characters are broken in different ways and healing is a slow process. Sacrifices are not just an option, they’re a given in a cruel world that demands the highest price from those willing to fight for what is right.

Rating: 4/5

★★★★

Mini Reviews: The Girl Who Could Silence the Wind + The Forgetting

MiniIt’s been a while since I put together a couple of mini reviews. I’m seeing a pattern emerge with these mini reviews, that I’m more likely to write them when I’ve rated a book three stars. It’s always those books in the middle that are sometimes hard to find all the right words for. This week I’m reviewing Meg Medina’s The Girl Who Could Silence the Wind and Sharon Cameron’s The Forgetting. Covers below are linked to Goodreads.

Title: The Girl Who Could Silence the Wind
Author: Meg Medina
Series: N/A
Pages: 256
Publisher: Candlewick
Release Date: March 13th 2012 

      “Sixteen-year-old Sonia Ocampo was born on the night of the worst storm Tres Montes had ever seen. And when the winds mercifully stopped, an unshakable belief in the girl’s protective powers began. All her life, Sonia has been asked to pray for sick mothers or missing sons, as worried parents and friends press silver milagros in her hands. Sonia knows she has no special powers, but how can she disappoint those who look to her for solace?
      Still, her conscience is heavy, so when she gets a chance to travel to the city and work in the home of a wealthy woman, she seizes it. At first, Sonia feels freedom in being treated like all the other girls. But when news arrives that her beloved brother has disappeared while looking for work, she learns to her sorrow that she can never truly leave the past or her family behind.

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“What would you do here in Tres Montes. Sonia? We both know that not even a magic girl can fill stomachs with wind and spells.”

Meg Medina’s The Girl Who Could Silence the Wind is a story of a girl who learns to define herself when her entire identity has been defined by how other people see her. For people in Tres Montes, Sonia Ocampo’s birth was a blessing that brought peace to the town when they were sure it would crumble under a storm. Over the years, her prayers on their behalf have kept them safe and healed the sick. But this gift has become a curse to Sonia, she grows weary of shouldering the town’s burdens and it feels impossible to continue when she begins to doubt her gift. Although I found this story enjoyable, I couldn’t help but want more. The novel itself was very short and I would have liked to have spent more time with Sonia and her town before she chose to leave it. With family ties at its core, The Girl Who Could Silence the Wind is a beautifully told coming-of-age story that is both heartbreaking and hopeful.

Rating: 3/5

★★★


Title: The Forgetting
Author: Sharon Cameron
Series: N/A
Pages: 403
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Release Date: September 13th 2016

      “Nadia lives in the city of Canaan, where life is safe and structured, hemmed in by white stone walls and no memory of what came before. But every twelve years the city descends into the bloody chaos of the Forgetting, a day of no remorse, when each person’s memories – of parents, children, love, life, and self – are lost. Unless they have been written.
      In Canaan, your book is your truth and your identity, and Nadia knows exactly who hasn’t written the truth. Because Nadia is the only person in Canaan who has never forgotten.
      But when Nadia begins to use her memories to solve the mysteries of Canaan, she discovers truths about herself and Gray, the handsome glassblower, that will change her world forever. As the anarchy of the Forgetting approaches, Nadia and Gray must stop an unseen enemy that threatens both their city and their own existence – before the people can forget the truth. And before Gray can forget her.”

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“We run, hard, and the ground falls away, and then we are the ones falling, soaring, and I catch a glimpse of the sparkling canyon, the misty pool below, the spray of the waterfall, three moons cresting the peak of a mountain.”

I approached Sharon Cameron’s The Forgetting with a little apprehension. Dystopian novels have had their day in my mind and they all start to sound alike after a while. This novel really didn’t offer anything new when compared to other dystopian books. I will say that Nadia’s character was different from what I typically see in these kind of novels. She’s quiet and withdrawn, a reaction to feeling very alone in the world. But Nadia also keeps herself closed off from others as a matter of self-preservation. Her closest relationship is with her younger sister Genivee, and even though her older sister Liliya is determined to be rid of her, Nadia shows a deep devotion to both. Gray himself was a likable character, but there was nothing particularly unique about him. The Forgetting wasn’t necessarily a bad book, but not much about it felt very memorable.

Rating: 3/5

★★★

ARC Review: Iron Cast by Destiny Soria

the-iron-cast-by-destiny-soria

Title: Iron Cast
Author: Destiny Soria
Series: N/A
Pages: 384
Publisher: Amulet Books
Release Date: October 11th 2016
**I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, which does not influence my review** 

      “It’s Boston, 1919, and the Cast Iron club is packed. On stage, hemopaths—whose “afflicted” blood gives them the ability to create illusions through art—captivate their audience. Corinne and Ada have been best friends ever since infamous gangster Johnny Dervish recruited them into his circle. By night they perform for Johnny’s crowds, and by day they con Boston’s elite. When a job goes wrong and Ada is imprisoned, they realize how precarious their position is. After she escapes, two of the Cast Iron’s hires are shot, and Johnny disappears. With the law closing in, Corinne and Ada are forced to hunt for answers, even as betrayal faces them at every turn.

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Destiny Soria’s Iron Cast is a wonderful historical fantasy with a unique magical system and compelling characters. For those like Corinne and Ada, the world is not a welcoming place. Hemopathy, the ability to manipulate a person’s perception, is against the law. Clubs like the Cast Iron provide a safe haven for hemopaths who are shunned by the world and who still wish to practice their unusual talents. As a wordsmith, Corinne can create illusions with a simple poem. Ada, a gifted musician, has the ability to pull particular emotions from people with her violin. Even though they’ve both found a place at Cast Iron, there are those who will stop at nothing to rid the world of hemopaths for good.

I must start off by saying that I loved the relationship between Corinne and Ada. They may be very different people, but they are equally committed to one another. Their friendship didn’t come about easily and there are still times when their personalities clash, but they play off each other really well and know that above anything, they can rely completely on the other. Their sassy banter was a delight to read and they made a powerful pair in spite of all the things that went against them. I loved all of the powerful women in this book. There were no damsels in distress in this one and each female character showed strength in different ways which made the entire ensemble a delight to read about.

The world of hemopathy is beguiling and awe-inspiring. These gifts are described in such beautiful writing, I felt immediately transported. The author also does a really good job showing the negative side of having such a dangerous talent: the fear and ethical questions that arise when having the ability to manipulate others. Iron Cast emphasizes the importance of a self-made family in a world that won’t accept you for who you are and showcases a strong female friendship that had me smiling and pulled at my heartstings.

Rating: 4/5

★★★★