Twelve Days of…Latinx Book Recommendations: Day 10

This “Christmassy” series is brought to you by my love of books by Latinx authors and my need for all of you to read them. Every day for twelve days leading up to Christmas, I will be gifting you all with a recommendation of a book by a Latinx author, along with twelve reasons why you should pick it up. Hoping to have lots of fun with with series which I am not so subtly calling Twelve Days of… Latinx Book Recommendations. Covers are linked to Goodreads. Feel free to sing this first part to yourself aloud.

♬On the tenth day of Christmas, my favorite Latinx blogger gave to me, a recommendation for…♬

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

      “The Mayan god of death sends a young woman on a harrowing, life-changing journey in this one-of-a-kind fairy tale inspired by Mexican folklore.
    The Jazz Age is in full swing, but Casiopea Tun is too busy cleaning the floors of her wealthy grandfather’s house to listen to any fast tunes. Nevertheless, she dreams of a life far from her dusty small town in southern Mexico. A life she can call her own.
      Yet this new life seems as distant as the stars, until the day she finds a curious wooden box in her grandfather’s room. She opens it—and accidentally frees the spirit of the Mayan god of death, who requests her help in recovering his throne from his treacherous brother. Failure will mean Casiopea’s demise, but success could make her dreams come true.
      In the company of the strangely alluring god and armed with her wits, Casiopea begins an adventure that will take her on a cross-country odyssey from the jungles of Yucatán to the bright lights of Mexico City—and deep into the darkness of the Mayan underworld.”

Reasons You Need to Pick This One Up:

1. Based on Mayan mythology
2. MC who doesn’t fall into the Cinderella trope
3. Captivating storytelling
4. 1920s Mexico City
5. Road trip with a god
6. Slow burn romance
7. Clever MC
8. Deals with colorism and prejudice against Indigenous peoples
9. War between brother gods
10. Set partially in the underworld of Xibalba
11. Bittersweet
12. Manipulative villains

Have you read this one? Are you planning to read it? Have you ever read a book based on Mayan mythology?

The Friday 56: Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“Vucub-Kamé had been smart, he had scattered his brother’s organs across the land. He’d also built something. Far in the north, in Baja California, there awaited a tomb fit for a god.

Gods may not be killed, but Vucub-Kamé had found a way, just as he had found a way to imprison his brother in the first pace, a feat that few would have ever dared to contemplate.”

I’m back from hiatus! I’m so glad that this is the book I get to share with everyone today. Silvia Moreno-Garcia continues to impress with her latest novel Gods of Jade and Shadow. If you like exploring ancient myths and like fairy-tale like stories that feel rooted more in the real world, this is the one you should check out. Read my review here. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

From the Goodreads Synopsis:

      “The Mayan god of death sends a young woman on a harrowing, life-changing journey in this dark, one-of-a-kind fairy tale inspired by Mexican folklore.
      The Jazz Age is in full swing, but Casiopea Tun is too busy cleaning the floors of her wealthy grandfather’s house to listen to any fast tunes. Nevertheless, she dreams of a life far from her dusty small town in southern Mexico. A life she can call her own.
      Yet this new life seems as distant as the stars, until the day she finds a curious wooden box in her grandfather’s room. She opens it—and accidentally frees the spirit of the Mayan god of death, who requests her help in recovering his throne from his treacherous brother. Failure will mean Casiopea’s demise, but success could make her dreams come true.
      In the company of the strangely alluring god and armed with her wits, Casiopea begins an adventure that will take her on a cross-country odyssey from the jungles of Yucatán to the bright lights of Mexico City—and deep into the darkness of the Mayan underworld.”