October Fright 2018: Caution! Questionable Decision Making Ahead

Happy October! I hope you’ve been enjoying all the spooky posts I’ve put together this month as much as I’ve enjoyed making them. If you missed my last October Fright post, you may want to check it out as it is tied to this one. Check it out here: October Fright 2018: A Haunting We Will (Not) Go. For this post I’m listing spooky activities I would definitely be willing to try despite that little part of my brain telling me it would a very bad idea. Won’t you join me?

1. Spending the Night in a Haunted House – Is it weird that I’ve always dreamed about doing something like this? I probably wouldn’t spend the night wandering said house (I do not in fact have a death wish), but spending a night in a room where every little noise thrills and chills sounds very doable.

2. Befriending the Local Witch – I like the thought of friendly witches and maybe some unfriendly ones. Who better to have your back if someone gets on your bad side?

3. Visiting a Pet Cemetery – I actually think the idea of a pet cemetery is kind of sweet. I don’t know, all those beloved pets laid to rest with one another makes me a little teary eyed. Hoping none of them rise from the dead though with a taste for human flesh.

4. Having Nightmares – This may seem like the odd one, but I’ve spent all my life having never suffered from nightmares. I have very vivid dreams, but only a handful of them have ever been scary. I feel like I’ve been missing out on some night time terrors.

5. Watch a Scary Movie in a Theater at Night All by Myself – I don’t even think the movie would have to be very scary in this case. The very thought of being all alone with only your imagination as company thrills me. I personally think The Shining would be the perfect movie for this scenario. The isolation of the characters and movie score would play tricks on the mind.

6. Play Hide-and-Seek in a Graveyard – I almost did this as a teen, but some of the more male members of the group chickened out. Wimps. What do you think? Would you join me for a game of hide-n-seek in a graveyard?

Which creepy activities would you like to take part in? Any of these that you would avoid? Let’s talk in the comments!

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October Fright 2018: A Haunting We Will (Not) Go

Happy October, everyone! This month I am celebrating Halloween with some creepy posts and even creepier reads. I always like to put together at least a couple of non-bookish Halloween posts for your enjoyment. As much as I adore all thing strange and spooky, there are certain activities that the practical (slightly superstitious) side of me will never do. I enjoy scary stories, but I don’t desire to be a part of one. Thus the focus of this post: A Haunting We Will (Not) Go. Tomorrow I’ll be sharing some creepy activities that I wouldn’t mind taking part in. Also, please don’t everyone praise my graphic making abilities at once (ha, they are so cheesy).

1. Spend Time in a Coffin – OH! I’m getting the chills just thinking about this. Ever since I became asthmatic, tiny closed spaces are a big no-no for me. Also, I can’t shake the fear that whomever puts me in said coffin might forget about me, play a joke and keep me in there longer than we agreed, the coffin lid will suddenly becoming stuck, and my favorite, discovering I’m in there with a dead body.

2. Hold a Seance – If there was ever a list to ensure you never ended up in a horror story, this would be at the top. No seance in a scary movie ever ended well. It doesn’t matter whether or not I believe in ghosts, spirits, or the like. With my luck, if I ever held a seance, I’d probably end up summoning a demon.

3. Play With a Ouija Board – Speaking of demons, I have never nor will I ever play with a Ouija board. When I was a kid, our downstairs neighbors had a Ouija board and wanted to try it and I was like no way, ain’t gonna happen, because even at eight years old, I knew you do not tempt the devil.

4. Take Part in an Exorcism – Exorcisms creep me out like you would not believe. Okay, confession time. I once found myself on a site listing top ten creepiest recordings and one of them was supposedly of an exorcism. I actually think I might still have it bookmarked because at the time I had to share my terror with other people. I haven’t touched it for years, but I still think about the voices on the recording and ah, I just got the chills.

5. Summon Bloody Mary – Another childhood story coming your way. When I was in elementary school, Bloody Mary was a big deal. I remember kids would go into the bathrooms, turn on all the faucets, flush the toilets, close the door, shut off the lights and chant Bloody Mary while looking in the mirror. I took no part in such tomfoolery. I remember not even feeling brave enough to do it at home. Still to this day, I have never tried this ritual and will go to my grave never having done so.

6. Spend the Night in the Woods – There are places that you don’t go because it is far too easy to get lost. Space. The ocean. IKEA. And the woods. This is especially true if I somehow end up on some foolish expedition in search of a ghost, witch, or abandoned cabin in the woods. At that point I’d just be begging to be killed.

What are some scary shenanigans that you would never partake in? Do we share any? Let’s talk in the comments!

October Fright 2018: Favorite Reads from Octobers Past

Happy October! This month I’m celebrating my favorite holiday with all the creepy reads and Halloween-themed posts. I’ve made an effort over the last few years to pick up spooky reads during the month of October and I’ve ended up reading some really great picks (and a few duds if I’m honest). For this post, I’m listing ten of my favorite reads from Octobers past. Covers are linked to Goodreads.

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1. The Accident Season by Moïra Fowley-Doyle – If I could read one book every October, it would be this one. It’s atmospheric and eerie and you spend the majority of the book not quite sure what to make of it. It also takes place during the month of October which is just perfect.

2. Slasher Girls & Monster Boys, Edited by April Genevieve Tucholke – I don’t read anthologies often, but if there were more horror ones featuring my favorite authors, I’d be more likely to check them out. I really liked this collection and it got me curious about several authors I wasn’t familiar with.

3. Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz, Illustrated by Stephen Gammell – I picked this one up and its sequel one year for nostalgic purposes. This used to be one of my favorite books as a kid and those illustrations are beyond haunting. I can’t believe we are finally getting an adaptation. Someone pinch me.

4. Bad Blood by Jennifer Lynn Barnes – It took me a while to finally pick up the conclusion to this thriller series and I’m going to miss this ensemble a lot. I’d really like to see more mysteries in YA like this one, with smart characters and terrifying villains.

5. Penpal by Dathan Auerbach – I bought the ebook of this one on a whim and I’m so glad I did. It’s one of the few reads that has actually given me the chills. Also, I now think penpals are a terrible idea.

6. Through the Woods by Emily Carroll – I’m still a graphic novel reading newbie. I just discovered the horror and graphic novel combination and I think this is my sweet spot. The illustrations in this one are fantastic and the stories just eerie enough to make you sit up.

7. The Hollow Girl by Hillary Monahan – I wasn’t sure what we would get with this one as it’s about witches and a rape survivor, but I thought it was incredibly empowering and Gran will forever be one of the fieriest characters I’ve read.

8. A Madness So Discreet by Mindy McGinnis – I remember reading this when I was going through a slump, but it still managed to really impress me. I loved how dark this one was and I am still in search of a novel like it.

9. Hunting Prince Dracula by Kerri Manscalco – I’m so glad I picked this one up during October. The setting and mystery really fit the bill. Audrey Rose and Thomas remain one of my favorite duos.

10. The Merciless II: The Exorcism of Sofia Flores by Danielle Vega – This sequel really surprised me as I just thought the first novel was just okay. This one was ten times more horrifying and why oh why don’t we have more horror novels in YA? I feel like there’s an untapped market for it.

Do you read horror novels during the month of October? Do you have any favorites you’ve picked up over the years? Let’s talk in the comments.

Latinx Heritage Month 2018, Part V: Wish List

Happy Latinx Heritage Month! September 15th through October 15th, I’m celebrating Latinx Heritage Month with a series of posts and a Twitter giveaway. Head on over here to check out my giveaway tweet. If you missed out on my previous posts, check them out here:

Latinx Heritage Month 2018, Part I: Favorite Reads

Latinx Heritage Month 2018, Part II: New and Upcoming Releases

Latinx Heritage Month 2018, Part III: Latinx Poets You Should Know

Latinx Heritage Month 2018, Part IV: Backlist TBR

For this final post I am sharing with you my wish list for books that focus on Latinx characters. There are so many things I’d love to see explored and so many stories I don’t think Latinx authors have had the opportunity to explore. Many of these topics are issues that require both honesty and care and thus I’d like to see authors from within these communities write them. Titles are linked to Goodreads.

1. Retellings – I want all the retellings, but starring Latinx characters. I want the Twelve Latinx Dancing Princesses, a Latina Cinderella and maybe even see The Picture of Dorian Gray reimagined with Latinx protagonist.

Examples: Blanca & Roja by Anna-Marie McLemore and Pride by Ibi Zoboi

2. Witches – I can never have enough witchy books and after reading a few witchy books featuring Latina characters, I now need all the Latinx witch books. I want good witches and bad witches and morally grey witches.

Examples: Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova and Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson

3. Magical Realism – When talking Latinx authors, it should be a given that we get magical realism novels, but aside from a few Latinx YA authors, I don’t see this genre explored enough. I need more Latinx authors writing these books because this is one of my very favorite genres.

Examples: When the Moon Was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore and Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe García McCall

4. Mental Health – Talking mental health within the Latinx community requires the kind of nuance you can only get from someone who’s experienced it. It’s a taboo subject that isn’t always easy to talk about, but it needs more attention than it’s gotten.

Examples: The Memory of Light by Francisco X. Stork and History Is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera

5. More LGBTQIA+ Representation – I think we’re pretty lucky to have the selection of LBGTQIA+ Latinx novels we have now, especially if you understand homophobia in the Latinx community. This is another one of these issues that I would need to see explored by someone within the community.

Examples: Wild Beauty by Anna-Marie McLemore and More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

6. Fluff – I want to see more Latinx characters being carefree and happy. When I see us in contemporaries, there is always a heavy burden on the protagonist’s shoulders. Sometimes I crave more of a lighthearted read, but finding one with Latinx characters is sometimes difficult.

Example: The Victoria in My Head by Janelle Milanes

7. Historical Fiction – How many historical fiction books have you read that that center Latinx characters? Though I love reading contemporaries that center us, I also want ones that acknowledge that we’ve been here for years, that we’ve mattered, and there are stories of our past that are worth hearing.

Examples: Shame the Stars by Guadalupe García McCall, Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Pérez, Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina.

8. Afro-Latinx RepresentaionColorism and anti-Blackness are real issues in the community that need to be addressed head on. It’s also important to specifically rally around Afro-Latinx voices because for too long their voices have been ignored.

Examples: The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo and Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older

9. More Racial Diversity – Did you know there are large Arab-Latinx communities in Latin America? What about Asian Latinxs? When’s the last time you came across a book written by an Indigenous Latinx author? Latinx people can be of any race, but, for example, I’ve only ever come across one book featuring an Asian Latinx character (The Way You Make Me Feel by Maurene Goo – protagonist’s parents are Korean Brazilian). I’d really like to see all these communities represented.

10. High fantasy – I really can’t think of a Latinx high fantasy that pays homage to our history while simultaneously allowed to explore fantastical worlds. When I think of Latinx characters in fantastical settings, my mind immediately wanders to urban fantasy, but this isn’t the kind I’m thinking for this one. I think a Latinx fantasy novel done right can also function as a commentary on genocide and colonialism both of which are very much a part of Latinx history. I’m basing the following example on the synopsis alone, as it hasn’t been released yet.

Example: Nocturna by Maya Motayne

Have you read any books that explore these topics (please note I am specifically looking for books by Latinx authors)? Any upcoming books that I should be aware of or topics you’d like to see explored more? Let’s discuss in the comments!

October Fright 2018: Five Horror Shows I’m Binge-Watching This Fall

Happy October! Hope everyone is having a creeptastic month so far. As you’ve might have noticed the blog has undergone a Halloween-esque makeover. I’m a big fan of the holiday and this month I’m putting together some horror-inspired posts while also picking up some thrilling reads. Today I’ve got a list of creepy shows that I am planning to binge-watch this October and fall season.

1. Goosebumps (Netflix) – This show was a staple of my childhood. I recently discovered Netflix carries these episodes and I have been in nostalgia heaven. It makes me want to cast my October TBR aside and just binge-read Goosebumps books instead. Perhaps one day. I also loved Are You Afraid of the Dark? Let me know if you know where I can find episodes of this show!

2. Slasher (Netflix/Chiller) – I heard a couple of bloggers talk about this show and I’m curious enough that I want to check it out on Netflix sometime this month. I don’t know much beyond what I assume from the title and that it’s an anthology series. As it were, I had a hard time finding a gif for this one without knowing much. I think this is from Slasher.

3. The Haunting of Hill House (Netflix) – I am so stoked for this one. It comes out October 12th and at first I thought it was just going to be a movie, but it’s a series and I’m even more excited. What’s Halloween without a haunted house story? Watch the trailer above if you haven’t done so yet!

4. Chilling Adventures of Sabrina (Netflix) – I read the graphic novel this is based on last year and loved it. I’ve always been a fan of Sabrina the Teenage Witch and when I saw there was a darker take on the story, I had to read it. Now that they’ve made a series for it, I am over the moon. Check out how dark and sinister this one looks in the trailer.

5. Channel Zero: The Dream Door (Syfy) – Technically I won’t be binge-watching this one since it will air weekly, but I still wanted to include it. I’ve enjoyed every season of this weird and creepy show. Listen, if I found a door in the basement of the house I grew up in but had no memory of it, I’d be out of that house so fast. But I don’t mind watching others make the terrible mistake of opening the door. The trailer for this one gives me the creeps and has me wishing October 26th would hurry up already.

Are you planning to watch any of these? Which horror shows are you hoping to catch this October and beyond? Let’s talk in the comments!

Latinx Heritage Month 2018, Part IV: Backlist TBR

Happy Latinx Heritage Month! Join me September 15th through October 15th as I celebrate Latinx authors with a post every Saturday. I’m currently hosting a Twitter giveaway where you can win a book by any Latinx author. If you haven’t entered, you can find all the info here. If you missed any of my previous posts, I’ve linked them below:

Latinx Heritage Month 2018, Part I: Favorite Reads

Latinx Heritage Month, Part II: New & Upcoming Releases

Latinx Heritage Month, Part III: Latinx Poets You Should Know

There is never enough time in the year to pick up all the books that I want to read, so for this post I’m highlighting a few books by Latinx authors that I’ve been meaning to get to and hope to read over the course of the next year. All of these are already published, so if you’re looking to pick up one of these now, they’re all available. Covers are linked to Goodreads.

Backlist TBR Books:

1. Anger Is a Gift by Mark Oshiro 

      “Six years ago, Moss Jefferies’ father was murdered by an Oakland police officer. Along with losing a parent, the media’s vilification of his father and lack of accountability has left Moss with near crippling panic attacks.
      Now, in his sophomore year of high school, Moss and his fellow classmates find themselves increasingly treated like criminals by their own school. New rules. Random locker searches. Constant intimidation and Oakland Police Department stationed in their halls. Despite their youth, the students decide to organize and push back against the administration.
      When tensions hit a fever pitch and tragedy strikes, Moss must face a difficult choice: give in to fear and hate or realize that anger can actually be a gift.”

2. The Fall of Innocence by Jenny Torres Sanchez

      “For the past eight years, sixteen-year-old Emilia DeJesus has done her best to move on from the traumatic attack she suffered in the woods behind her elementary school. She’s forced down the memories–the feeling of the twigs cracking beneath her, choking on her own blood, unable to scream. Most of all, she’s tried to forget about Jeremy Lance, the boy responsible, the boy who caused her such pain. Emilia believes that the crows who watched over her that day, who helped her survive, are still on her side, encouraging her to live fully. And with the love and support of her mother, brother, and her caring boyfriend, Emilia is doing just that.
      But when a startling discovery about her attacker’s identity comes to light, and the memories of that day break through the mental box in which she’d shut them away, Emilia is forced to confront her new reality and make sense of shifting truths about her past, her family, and herself.”

3. Prime Meridian by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

      “Love, life, dreams, and a world beyond reach.
      Amelia dreams of Mars. The Mars of the movies and the imagination, an endless bastion of opportunities for a colonist with some guts. But she’s trapped in Mexico City, enduring the drudgery of an unkind metropolis, working as a rent-a-friend, selling her blood to old folks with money who hope to rejuvenate themselves with it, enacting a fractured love story. And yet there’s Mars, at the edge of the silver screen, of life. It awaits her.”

4. Show and Prove by Sofia Quintero

      “A poignant coming-of-age story about two boys finding their way in the South Bronx in the mid-1980s.
      The summer of 1983 was the summer hip-hop proved its staying power. The South Bronx is steeped in Reaganomics, war in the Middle East, and the twin epidemics of crack and AIDS, but Raymond “Smiles” King and Guillermo “Nike” Vega have more immediate concerns.
      Smiles was supposed to be the assistant crew chief at his summer camp, but the director chose Cookie Camacho instead, kicking off a summer-long rivalry. Meanwhile, the aspiring b-boy Nike has set his wandering eye on Sara, the sweet yet sassy new camp counselor, as well as top prize at a breakdancing competition downtown. The two friends have been drifting apart ever since Smiles got a scholarship to a fancy private school, and this summer the air is heavy with postponed decisions that will finally be made.
      Raw and poignant, this is a story of music, urban plight, and racial tension that’s as relevant today as it was in 1983.”

5. Corazón by Yesika Salgado

      “Corazón is a love story. It is about the constant hunger for love. It is about feeding that hunger with another person and finding that sometimes it isn’t enough. Salgado creates a world in which the heart can live anywhere; her fat brown body, her parents home country, a lover, a toothbrush, a mango, or a song. It is a celebration of heartache, of how it can ruin us, but most importantly how we always survive it and return to ourselves whole.”

6. The Disturbed Girl’s Dictionary by NoNieqa Ramos

      “Macy’s school officially classifies her as “disturbed,” but Macy isn’t interested in how others define her. She’s got more pressing problems: her mom can’t move off the couch, her dad’s in prison, her brother’s been kidnapped by Child Protective Services, and now her best friend isn’t speaking to her. Writing in a dictionary format, Macy explains the world in her own terms—complete with gritty characters and outrageous endeavors. With an honesty that’s both hilarious and fearsome, slowly Macy reveals why she acts out, why she can’t tell her incarcerated father that her mom’s cheating on him, and why her best friend needs protection . . . the kind of protection that involves Macy’s machete.”

7. Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

      “In the vein of Isabel Allende and Gabriel Garcia Marquez, a mesmerizing debut set against the backdrop of the devastating violence of 1990’s Colombia about a sheltered young girl and a teenage maid who strike an unlikely friendship that threatens to undo them both.
      The Santiago family lives in a gated community in Bogotá, safe from the political upheaval terrorizing the country. Seven-year-old Chula and her older sister Cassandra enjoy carefree lives thanks to this protective bubble, but the threat of kidnappings, car bombs, and assassinations hover just outside the neighborhood walls, where the godlike drug lord Pablo Escobar continues to elude authorities and capture the attention of the nation.
      When their mother hires Petrona, a live-in-maid from the city’s guerrilla-occupied slum, Chula makes it her mission to understand Petrona’s mysterious ways. But Petrona’s unusual behavior belies more than shyness. She is a young woman crumbling under the burden of providing for her family as the rip tide of first love pulls her in the opposite direction. As both girls’ families scramble to maintain stability amidst the rapidly escalating conflict, Petrona and Chula find themselves entangled in a web of secrecy that will force them both to choose between sacrifice and betrayal.
      Inspired by the author’s own life, and told through the alternating perspectives of the willful Chula and the achingly hopeful Petrona, Fruit of the Drunken Tree contrasts two very different, but inextricable coming-of-age stories. In lush prose, Rojas Contreras sheds light on the impossible choices women are often forced to make in the face of violence and the unexpected connections that can blossom out of desperation.”

8. My Year in the Middle by Lily Quintero Weaver

      “In a racially polarized classroom in 1970 Alabama, Lu’s talent for running track makes her a new best friend — and tests her mettle as she navigates the school’s social cliques.
      Sixth-grader Lu Olivera just wants to keep her head down and get along with everyone in her class. Trouble is, Lu’s old friends have been changing lately — acting boy crazy and making snide remarks about Lu’s newfound talent for running track. Lu’s secret hope for a new friend is fellow runner Belinda Gresham, but in 1970 Red Grove, Alabama, blacks and whites don’t mix. As segregationist ex-governor George Wallace ramps up his campaign against the current governor, Albert Brewer, growing tensions in the state — and in the classroom — mean that Lu can’t stay neutral about the racial divide at school. Will she find the gumption to stand up for what’s right and to choose friends who do the same?”

9. They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera

      “On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today.
      Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure—to live a lifetime in a single day.”

10. Stef Soto, Taco Queen by Jennifer Torres

      “Estefania ‘Stef’ Soto is itching to shake off the onion-and-cilantro embrace of Tia Perla, her family’s taco truck. She wants nothing more than for her dad to get a normal job and for Tia Perla to be put out to pasture. It’s no fun being known as the “Taco Queen” at school. But just when it looks like Stef is going to get exactly what she wants, and her family’s livelihood is threatened, she will have to become the truck’s unlikely champion.”

11. Like Vanessa by Tami Charles

      “In this semi-autobiographical debut novel set in 1983, Vanessa Martin’s real-life reality of living with family in public housing in Newark, New Jersey is a far cry from the glamorous Miss America stage. She struggles with an incarcerated mother she barely remembers, a grandfather dealing with addiction and her own battle with self-confidence. But when a new teacher at school coordinates a beauty pageant and convinces Vanessa to enter, Vanessa’s view of her own world begins to change. Vanessa discovers that her own self-worth is more than the scores of her talent performance and her interview answers, and that she doesn’t need a crown to be comfortable in her own skin and see her own true beauty.”

12. Warren the 13th and the All-Seeing Eye by Tania del Rio

      “Warren the 13th is the lone bellhop, valet, waiter, groundskeeper, and errand boy of his family’s ancient hotel. It’s a strange, shadowy mansion full of crooked corridors and mysterious riddles—and it just might be home to a magical object known as the All-Seeing Eye. Can Warren decipher the clues and find the treasure before his sinister Aunt Annaconda (and a slew of greedy hotel guests) beats him to it?
      This middle-grade adventure features gorgeous two-color illustrations on every page and a lavish two-column Victorian design that will pull young readers into a spooky and delightful mystery.”

13. Everyone Knows You Go Home by Natalie Sylvester   

      “From the acclaimed author of Chasing the Sun comes a new novel about immigration and the depths to which one Mexican American family will go for forgiveness and redemption.
      The first time Isabel meets her father-in-law, Omar, he’s already dead—an apparition appearing uninvited on her wedding day. Her husband, Martin, still unforgiving for having been abandoned by his father years ago, confesses that he never knew the old man had died. So Omar asks Isabel for the impossible: persuade Omar’s family—especially his wife, Elda—to let him redeem himself.
      Isabel and Martin settle into married life in a Texas border town, and Omar returns each year on the celebratory Day of the Dead. Every year Isabel listens, but to the aggrieved Martin and Elda, Omar’s spirit remains invisible. Through his visits, Isabel gains insight into not just the truth about his disappearance and her husband’s childhood but also the ways grief can eat away at love. When Martin’s teenage nephew crosses the Mexican border and takes refuge in Isabel and Martin’s home, questions about past and future homes, borders, and belonging arise that may finally lead to forgiveness—and alter all their lives forever.”

14. Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enríquez

      “In these wildly imaginative, devilishly daring tales of the macabre, internationally bestselling author Mariana Enriquez brings contemporary Argentina to vibrant life as a place where shocking inequality, violence, and corruption are the law of the land, while military dictatorship and legions of desaparecidos loom large in the collective memory. In these stories, reminiscent of Shirley Jackson and Julio Cortázar, three young friends distract themselves with drugs and pain in the midst a government-enforced blackout; a girl with nothing to lose steps into an abandoned house and never comes back out; to protest a viral form of domestic violence, a group of women set themselves on fire.
      But alongside the black magic and disturbing disappearances, these stories are fueled by compassion for the frightened and the lost, ultimately bringing these characters—mothers and daughters, husbands and wives—into a surprisingly familiar reality. Written in hypnotic prose that gives grace to the grotesque, Things We Lost in the Fire is a powerful exploration of what happens when our darkest desires are left to roam unchecked, and signals the arrival of an astonishing and necessary voice in contemporary fiction. “

Have you read any of these books? Which backlist books by Latinx authors do you still need to get to? Let’s discuss in the comments.