Mini-Reviews: Raybearer + You Should See Me in a Crown

I got a chance to catch up on some 2020 releases by Black authors this Black History Month. Today I am bringing you reviews from two debut authors from 2020. Jordan Ifueko’s Raybearer immediately caught my attention when I saw the cover below. Fantasy is my favorite genre and so I am always on the lookout for diverse fantasy books. Leah Johnson’s You Should See Me in a Crown is also a book that caught my attention because of the cover. I know illustrated covers are the current trend, but I would still like to see more Black models and other people of color on covers.

Title: Raybearer
Author: Jordan Ifueko
Series: Raybearer, #1
Pages: 496
Publisher: Hot Key Books
Release Date: August 18th 2020

TW: domestic homicide, abuse, suicide

      “Nothing is more important than loyalty.
But what if you’ve sworn to protect the one you were born to destroy?
      Tarisai has always longed for the warmth of a family. She was raised in isolation by a mysterious, often absent mother known only as The Lady. The Lady sends her to the capital of the global empire of Aritsar to compete with other children to be chosen as one of the Crown Prince’s Council of 11. If she’s picked, she’ll be joined with the other Council members through the Ray, a bond deeper than blood. That closeness is irresistible to Tarisai, who has always wanted to belong somewhere. But The Lady has other ideas, including a magical wish that Tarisai is compelled to obey: Kill the Crown Prince once she gains his trust. Tarisai won’t stand by and become someone’s pawn—but is she strong enough to choose a different path for herself? With extraordinary world-building and breathtaking prose, Raybearer is the story of loyalty, fate, and the lengths we’re willing to go for the ones we love.”

swirl (2)Jordan Ifueko’s Raybearer is unlike any other fantasy I’ve ever read. From its magical system to its politics, the Arit empire is a fully formed world. Tarisai is a compelling lead character as Ifueko takes readers on a journey from her unconventional childhood to the tribulations she faces coming into her own power. Tarisai was raised for one purpose only, to be her mother’s weapon against those who had wronged her. But even as a child, Tarisai shows a strong sense of right and wrong. She finds herself as a potential future council member of Prince Ekundayo. But caring about the prince could spell his doom as well as her own if her mother has her way. Raybearer explores many different kinds of relationships, but none are more important than the bonds Tarisai forms with her fellow council members. She finds a kindred spirit in the kind Sanjeet, whose own childhood haunts him. Found family plays a significant role in shaping who Tarisai becomes. Council members are bonded by their love for their Raybearer and for each other. Tarisai is not a warrior in the traditional sense, her strength lies in her ability to lead, her desire to see the world become better, and the strong sense of justice that leads her to go against even the most powerful players in the empire. But this doesn’t mean she doesn’t falter. She continuously struggles with her own inner demons, trying to discern between whether she can determine her own future or if her fate has already been decided for her. Raybearer is perfect for those looking to be swept up in a unique fantasy world’s mythology as well as those interested in a character-driven narrative.

★ ★ ★ ★
(4/5)


Title: You Should See Me in a Crown
Author: Roseanne A. Brown
Series: N/A
Pages: 336
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Release Date: June 2nd 2020

TW: death of a parent, racism, homophobia, public outing, panic attacks

      “Liz Lighty has always believed she’s too black, too poor, too awkward to shine in her small, rich, prom-obsessed midwestern town. But it’s okay — Liz has a plan that will get her out of Campbell, Indiana, forever: attend the uber-elite Pennington College, play in their world-famous orchestra, and become a doctor.
      But when the financial aid she was counting on unexpectedly falls through, Liz’s plans come crashing down . . . until she’s reminded of her school’s scholarship for prom king and queen. There’s nothing Liz wants to do less than endure a gauntlet of social media trolls, catty competitors, and humiliating public events, but despite her devastating fear of the spotlight she’s willing to do whatever it takes to get to Pennington.
      The only thing that makes it halfway bearable is the new girl in school, Mack. She’s smart, funny, and just as much of an outsider as Liz. But Mack is also in the running for queen. Will falling for the competition keep Liz from her dreams . . . or make them come true?”

swirl (2)

Liz Lighty’s future is perfectly planned out. She’s going to attend her mother’s alma mater, Pennington, on her way to becoming a hematologist. But everything falls apart when she doesn’t receive the scholarship she needs. Now, in order to salvage her dreams, Liz is doing the unthinkable. She’s running for prom queen. Prom is not just a high school dance in Campbell County, it’s the event of the year. Thrust into the spotlight, Liz must find a way to carve space for herself in a world where her Blackness and queerness set her apart and sometimes makes her feel unwelcome. Liz is an easy character to like. Her dreams for the future are intertwined with the death of her mother and her younger brother’s same sickle-cell diagnosis. She tends to spread herself thin if it means keeping the burden off her loved ones. She isn’t used to having good things come her way easily and so accepting these good things can sometimes be hard. When she meets Mack, a fellow prom queen candidate, her attraction to her throws her off. I loved the easy rapport between these characters. Liz is only out to her family and close friends and knows that starting a relationship with Mack might jeopardize her campaign, but she keeps getting drawn to the gregarious and alluring Mack. Johnson explores a trope that we really don’t see often and that’s the second-chance friendship. Liz ends up reconnecting with her former best friend, Jordan, and even though there is still a lot of past hurt, they fall into step with one another effortlessly. These two get each other in a way that is rare and feels truly special. You Should See Me in a Crown is all about embracing who you, not allowing others to change you, and demanding that people make room for you. Leah Johnson’s debut is infused with charm and is guaranteed to leave you with a big grin on your face.

★ ★ ★ ★
(4/5)

12 thoughts on “Mini-Reviews: Raybearer + You Should See Me in a Crown

  1. Brilliant post!! Ray bearer sounds amazing, definitely adding that to my wtr list😊 I read you should see me in a crown recently and totally agree that it left me with a grin! I think it would make an amazing movie – I can honestly see it already some of the scenes were so vivid. Mack and liz’s relationship was great but like you said I like how there was a lot of character development too. Here’s my review! https://hundredsandthousandsofbooks.blog/2021/03/24/feel-good-books-you-should-see-me-in-a-crown/

    Like

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