Mini Reviews: The Only Good Indians (ARC Review) & Wilder Girls

Hello, friends, I am returning to blogging only on a very tentative basis. This week I have a set of two horror novel reviews to share. After picking up Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s Mexican Gothic, I really wanted more horror in my life. I tend to watch horror movies/shows, but haven’t really explored the literary genre in a significant way. As a result, these two horror novels will not be the only ones you see me review this year.

Title: The Only Good Indians
Author: Stephen Graham Jones
Series: N/A
Pages: 320
Publisher: Gallery/Saga Press
Release Date: July 14th 2020

**I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley which does not influence my review**

      “The creeping horror of Paul Tremblay meets Tommy Orange’s There There in a dark novel of revenge, cultural identity, and the cost of breaking from tradition in this latest novel from the Jordan Peele of horror literature, Stephen Graham Jones.
      Seamlessly blending classic horror and a dramatic narrative with sharp social commentary, The Only Good Indians follows four American Indian men after a disturbing event from their youth puts them in a desperate struggle for their lives. Tracked by an entity bent on revenge, these childhood friends are helpless as the culture and traditions they left behind catch up to them in a violent, vengeful way.”

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Stephen Graham Jones’s The Only Good Indians is a harrowing horror novel about retribution and the consequences of running from your past. Ricky, Gabe, Cass, and Lewis grew up together on the Blackfeet reservation. After a hunting incident that gets them banned from taking part ever again, the friend group slowly drifts apart. But no matter how much time has passed from that fateful night, none of them can outrun what happened and what their actions gave birth to. Jones takes each of his characters and pushes them to the brink, where they begin to question reality and then slowly pulls the loose thread, unraveling their sanity. Though The Only Good Indians has a slow start, once it reaches its climax, Jones slams on the gas and takes readers on one of the most unrelenting, brutal endings I’ve ever read. Just when you think the story could not get any wilder, Jones guts you and leaves you in a state of shock. The Only Good Indians takes no prisoners and is a must read for horror fans everywhere.

★ ★ ★ ★
(4/5)


Title: Wilder Girls
Author: Rory Power
Series: N/A
Pages: 357
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Release Date: July 9th 2019

      “It’s been eighteen months since the Raxter School for Girls was put under quarantine. Since the Tox hit and pulled Hetty’s life out from under her.
    It started slow. First the teachers died one by one. Then it began to infect the students, turning their bodies strange and foreign. Now, cut off from the rest of the world and left to fend for themselves on their island home, the girls don’t dare wander outside the school’s fence, where the Tox has made the woods wild and dangerous. They wait for the cure they were promised as the Tox seeps into everything.
      But when Byatt goes missing, Hetty will do anything to find her, even if it means breaking quarantine and braving the horrors that lie beyond the fence. And when she does, Hetty learns that there’s more to their story, to their life at Raxter, than she could have ever thought true.”

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      “I expected it to be different. I watch the trees attack the fence, the dark between them thick and reaching. I know what the Tox does. But I thought something of my old life would still be here. I thought something of us would have survived.”

Rory Power’s Wilder Girls had such an interesting premise revolving around an all-girls boarding school being overrun by a mysterious illness; however, this one failed to hold my attention even with the shock of body horror woven throughout. Wilder Girls revolves around three friends, Hetty, Byatt, and Reese, who, along with their classmates, have been kept in quarantine for the last year and a half at their school. The Tox, which first killed off most of the students and teachers, has ravaged the bodies of those at Raxter School for Girls. My first issue with this one was the set up, I found it hard to believe that these privileged girls’ families would somehow stand by while they were kept in quarantine for so long. Even with more explanation later on, I just could not wrap my brain around the fact that no one from the outside had ever tried to make contact with them outside of the CDC and Navy. I enjoyed how complicated the relationships in the novel were (there are friendships and also an f/f romance), but also how these relationships were always strain because of their environment. However, I never felt a real connection to any of the girls. I also am puzzled over the fact that we got chapters in Hetty and Byatt’s POV, but never for Reese. Reese, who had a strong connection to someone outside the boarding school, would have given the novel a wider scope. The action is very limited to this island the school is located on and instead of making me as a reader feel the claustrophobia of their situation, it left me wanting more context to their world. The ending was also really unsatisfying, not because I expected everything to be tied up neatly, but because it felt like the story just sort of drops off and we are left with more questions and very little concrete answers.

★ ★
(2/5)

15 thoughts on “Mini Reviews: The Only Good Indians (ARC Review) & Wilder Girls

  1. I agree with so much about what you said about Wilder Girls! In my head I describe it as “all style, no substance” because the only thing it managed to do well was deliver an atmospheric setting and depict very graphic body horror, which I personally really enjoyed! I also thought it was an odd decision to not include a POV for Reese, since I feel she was a pretty important character. I have to finally get around to writing my rant review cause there’s still definitely a lot of thoughts that I need to get out of my chest 😬

    Liked by 1 person

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