The Friday 56: Allegedly

The Friday 56The Friday 56 is a weekly blog meme hosted by Freda’s Voice. Join us every Friday and share an excerpt from a book you’ve been reading.

Rules:

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader.
*Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grab you.
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post here in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url. It’s that simple.

**Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 post in the comments!**

“I swallow, thinking of my missing period, hoping it really will just be him and me. But maybe going away would be good. The farther we are, the less likely he’ll find out I killed a baby.

Allegedly.”

One of the most powerful debuts I’ve ever read, Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson, is a novel that will instantly grab you and not let go. It wowed me in so many ways, I don’t think there’s another book like it. Read my full review here. Cover is linked to Goodreads.

Goodreads Synopsis:

      “Mary B. Addison killed a baby.

      Allegedly. She didn’t say much in that first interview with detectives, and the media filled in the only blanks that mattered: A white baby had died while under the care of a church-going black woman and her nine-year-old daughter. The public convicted Mary and the jury made it official. But did she do it? She wouldn’t say.
      Mary survived six years in baby jail before being dumped in a group home. The house isn’t really “home”—no place where you fear for your life can be considered a home. Home is Ted, who she meets on assignment at a nursing home.
      There wasn’t a point to setting the record straight before, but now she’s got Ted—and their unborn child—to think about. When the state threatens to take her baby, Mary must find the voice to fight her past. And her fate lies in the hands of the one person she distrusts the most: her Momma. No one knows the real Momma. But who really knows the real Mary?

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28 thoughts on “The Friday 56: Allegedly

  1. This was definitely one of those powerful debuts that I’ve read, too. It was haunting and depressing, but at the same time there was always this little sliver of hope in there. I loved how unreliable Mary’s character was as the narrator. Such a great book!

    Liked by 1 person

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